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TTIMES WORLD: Health News Report

Friday, May 25, 2018
Washington, DC, USA


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A Smarter, Better Way: The ABC of Second Opinions From Doctors
By Dan E. Austin MD

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A. First Submit Your Question to the doctor and wait for a response. (Best medium is Email electronically; phone calls increasingly are not effective because of timing issues. Text messaging, tweeting, faxing are too limiting and popularity or availability are often poor. Email gives the best room to express yourself clearly with sufficiency, affordable timing and delivery is most available to you and the provider. Do not include any patient information; ensure its purely medical condition in your question. Provider may not be able to respond once patient information is exposed in any electronic medium).

1. Choose Type of Question
2. Select the most relevant to the condition you have question about.
3. Limit the medical condition or question preferably to one only or at most two.

B. Get Answers & Review
1. Read answers carefully and decide if the doctor has knowledge or interest in your particular issue or presentation
2. The earlier the response the more likely you are going to get better attention
3. If no response, the doctor likely has no interest or particular knowledge in your case, or has poor organizational structure to handle these matters at that time, in either case, you are likely to receive poor attention with such provider if you pursue such second opinion.

C. Follow Up Question or Conversation with the Doctor
1. Seek clarifications; ask further questions on any response items.
2. Establish the necessary rapport with doctor or provider before you accept consultation. Be sure you are connecting in understanding with that Provider.
3. Take time to review your ABC, as listed here, if you are satisfied – Proceed to set up appointment with doctor or Provider.

Be smart, saves time, resources and get better results with your consultations. Do not take the same steps that resulted in the initial unsatisfied consultation. Most of the problems that result in multiple consultations stems from lack of rapport and well established patient provider understanding. Once that professional trust is established 100% satisfaction guaranteed almost always results. It’s time to bid adieu to confusion in doctor consultation, when you need a second opinion submit your question to a known provider or a searched provider, if not submit addressed to Second Opinion at CS@Healthcare800.Com, be sure to include your area or city, your question will be submitted to the Top doctors in the field or specialty in that area. Follow the ABC of Second Opinion. Once you are satisfied, visit any Doctors/Hospital Web Portal, or healthcare800.com, make an appointment with that provider.
Its Time To Start Getting Professional Help the Smart Way!

Breast Cancer in Young Women
What You Can Do To Lower Your Risk

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What Can I Do to Lower My Risk?

It is important that you—
•Know how your breasts normally look and feel. If you notice a change in the size or shape of your breast, feel pain in your breast, have nipple discharge other than breast milk (including blood), or other symptoms, talk to a doctor right away.
•Make healthy choices. Keeping a healthy weight, getting enough physical activity and sleep, and breastfeeding your babies can help lower your overall risk. If you are taking, or have been told to take, hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives (birth control pills), ask your doctor about the risks.
•Talk to your doctor about your risk. If your risk is high, your doctor may talk to you about getting mammograms earlier and more often than other women, whether other screening tests might be right for you, and medicines or surgeries that can lower your risk. Your doctor may also suggest that you get genetic counseling to determine if you should be tested for changes in your BRCA1, BRCA2, and other genes related to breast cancer

4 Main Areas of your Body
Mostly Affected by Diabetes

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Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which inadequate production of the hormone insulin or a resistance to its actions in the body can lead to high blood sugar levels. Insulin is needed to get sugar into cells of the body, where it is used for energy. When sugar cannot get into cells, it remains in the blood at high levels. Complications of diabetes arise from long-term exposure to high blood sugar. The cardiovascular, nervous, visual and urinary systems are most commonly affected by chronically high blood sugars.

1. Heart and Blood Vessels

The cardiovascular system includes the heart and blood vessels. High blood sugar and increased blood fat levels commonly found in people with diabetes contribute to fatty deposits called plaques on the inner walls of blood vessels, causing inflammation. This leads to decreased blood flow and hardening of the blood vessels called atherosclerosis. High blood sugar also results in glycation, where sugars attach to proteins, making them sticky. This occurs on proteins found in blood vessels, also resulting in inflammation. When this occurs in the heart, it can lead to cardiovascular disease. According to a 2016 report from the American Heart Association, 68 percent of people with diabetes older than 65 die of heart disease.
Nervous System

2. Brain and Nerve damage:

Popularly called diabetic neuropathy, this damage is common in people with diabetes. Symptoms typically appear after several years but may be present when diabetes is diagnosed, as the disease may have gone undetected for many years. Diabetic nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy is most common in the legs and feet. According to a 2005 statement by the American Diabetes Association, up to 50 percent of people with diabetes have peripheral neuropathy. This typically starts as numbness or tingling that progresses to loss of pain and heat and cold perception in feet or hands, making it difficult to sense an injury. Another type of nerve damage called diabetic autonomic neuropathy affects nerves regulating the heart, blood vessels, and digestive and other systems. This condition can lead to problems with blood pressure, heart rhythm and digestion, among others.

3. Eye

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that in 2005 to 2008, 28.5 percent of adults with diabetes 40 years or older had diabetic retinopathy. This eye disease is caused by high blood sugar levels leading to blood vessel damage and fluid leakage in the vision-sensing part of the eye called the retina. Diabetic macular edema is a complication of diabetic retinopathy wherein the center of the retina, which is responsible for detailed vision, is affected. These conditions can eventually lead to blindness. High blood sugar can also lead to an increased risk of cataracts and glaucoma. These eye disorders occur earlier and more often in people with diabetes, compared to those without the disease.


4. Kidney and the Urinary System

In 2011, CDC reported that diabetes was the primary cause of kidney failure in 44 percent of people newly diagnosed with the condition. High levels of blood sugar can damage the kidneys. The result is an illness known as diabetic nephropathy that can eventually lead to kidney failure. High blood sugar levels initially damage the blood vessels in the kidneys. As diabetic nephropathy progresses, there is thickening of kidney tissue and scarring. When the kidneys are damaged, they cannot filter the blood properly. This results in waste and fluid buildup in the blood, and leakage of important blood proteins into the urine.

Seven Most Beautiful
And Extreme Places on Earth

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1. Antarctica (Credit: visitworldplaces.com)


Antarctica is on average the coldest, windiest, driest, and highest of the 7 continents. This desert continent is, however, home to millions of penguins of different species.



2. Victoria Falls that border Zambia and Zimbabwe is the largest waterfall in the world by total area. The falls transport an astonishing 1,088 cubic meters per second of water down an ~350-foot cliff.


3. Kauai, Hawaii owns the medal of the rainiest place on earth, allowing for a tropical paradise. Hike, swim, bike, and dive.


4. Bora Bora, French Polynesia (Credit: St. Regis Bora Bora)

Bora Bora is an island that once was a volcano, which has subsequently subsided and formed a barrier reef. The reef ecosystem allows for pristine clear blue water and reefs limit waves, providing a protected sanctuary.


5. Amazon River, Brazil (Credit: Dailybackgrounds.com)

The Amazon River is the artery for the largest rainforest in the world. It is the largest river in the world by discharge and one of the largest by length. The surrounding rainforest represents over half of the world's remaining rainforest.

6. Neuschwanstein, a nineteenth-century castle in southern Germany is the inspiration for Disneyland's Sleeping Beauty Castle. This German retreat is visited regularly during summer months as a symbol of refuge and peace.


7. Bison of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Yellowstone National Park is the oldest national park in the US and likely the world. Drive through the park and encounter an array of wildlife 10's of feet away from you.

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